McDonald Murholme is the leading employment law firm for employees located across Australia

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Read up on the latest news from McDonald Murholme, including case updates and legal commentary.

 

Why the whistleblower protections in Australia don’t work - HRM

“The fact that there has never been a successful whistleblower case in Australia speaks volumes.” The whistleblower protections in Australia are seriously lacking. Despite Parliament passing new legislation to expand the whistleblower protections in the Corporations Act to provide greater protections, there is still very little recourse for employees who are punished for shedding light

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Underpaid workers remain out of pocket months after employers apologise - ABC

A growing list of companies have admitted to underpaying workers, turning themselves in to the Fair Work Ombudsman and issuing mea culpas in the media, but it can be months or years before employees see any of the cash they are owed. Last week, Woolworths joined the list, reporting it owed up to $300 million to

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Proposed Victorian law to jail employers for workplace deaths - HRM

Is the proposed Victorian laws to severely punish leaders for workplace deaths and suicides just what we need or discriminatory? The Victorian state government has proposed laws that could see employers in both the public and private sectors facing up to 20 years of jail time and $16.5 million in fines for certain workplace deaths. The purpose

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Qantas, Bunnings and Super Retail Group among companies caught in underpayment scandal - news.com.au

Every week, a new major Aussie company seems to be caught out underpaying workers. Earlier this week, Woolworths made international headlines after it emerged the supermarket giant had underpaid nearly 6000 employees over the past nine years, with repayments expecting to cost up to $300 million. Today, The Australian revealed several huge firms, including Super Retail Group, Qantas, ABC,

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Australia’s whistleblower protections are not working - Lawyers Weekly

For some time, whistleblower protection in Australia in the private sector has fallen far short of achieving protection for employees, with legislation not striking the right balance, argues one lawyer. When asked by Lawyers Weekly if Australia’s whistleblower protections for private sector employees are working, McDonald Murholme lawyer Talitha Maugueret said that the simple answer

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Lessons from engagement of Victorian magistrate to court clerk - Lawyers Weekly

The relationship between Victorian magistrate Rodney Higgins and his 23-year fiancée Ashleigh Petrie is a reminder to employers to enact policies to protect themselves and their employees in the case of interoffice romances, as well as ensuring that juniors are not unduly disadvantaged. In recent days, mainstream media reported that Mr Higgins had proposed to Ms

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How to quit a new job if something better comes up - Seek

So, you’ve landed a job, signed on the dotted line and you’re all set to start your new role. Then you get a call that the dream job you’d given up on is now on offer. You’re keen to take up this dream opportunity, but you don’t want to burn any bridges—or break any contract

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Employment firm slams ‘ill-informed’ comments on unfair dismissal claims - Lawyers Weekly

Comments made earlier this week from the Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry’s director of workplace relations are “entirely misplaced” and seek to weaken a dismissed employee’s ability to hold an employer to account. McDonald Murholme principal lawyer Trent Hancock has taken ACCI director of workplace relations Scott Barklamb to task over his “ill-informed” comments

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Sunglass Hut to back pay part-time workers $2.3 million after turning itself in to the FWO - Smart Company

Sunglass Hut will back pay $2.3 million to its employees after admitting to underpaying individual workers by up to $42,912 in overtime wages. The failure to pay overtime came from Sunglass Hut’s failure to schedule regular shifts for its in-store part-time workers on paper, thus breaching the requirements of the General Retail Industry Award (GRIA),

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How the High Court’s decision on pieceworker rights will affect Aussie farmers - - Smart Company

Underpaid pieceworkers could be compensated according to minimum hourly award rates, following an appeal by the Fair Work Ombudsman (FWO) in a case against Queensland farm Marland Mushrooms. Currently, piece rates are paid by the amount employees can pick, pack, make or prune, similar to commission rate structures. Although the system is in place of

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Uber Eats’ fight against sacked driver has implications for the gig economy - Lawyers Weekly

An appeal to the Full Bench of the Fair Work Commission by a former Uber Eats delivery worker could have ramifications for employers who utilise workers in the gig economy, argues one lawyer. Amita Gupta, an Adelaide-based woman who recently unsuccessfully sued Uber Eats with the Fair Work Commission for unfair dismissal for allegedly showing up

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Stringent processes for employee dismissal are ‘absolutely essential’ - Lawyers Weekly

The recent awarding of $1.2 million to former James Cook University professor Peter Ridd shows that law firms must engage in “exhaustive consultation” with employees about the issues warranting dismissal. Speaking in the wake of Professor Ridd being awarded $1.2 million in damages from JCU following his successful unfair dismissal case, McDonald Murholme managing director

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Gig economy tested again as former Deliveroo rider takes company to court - HRM

FWO said Uber drivers were not employees, could the outcome of this court case change things? A former Deliveroo rider is taking the food delivery service company to court with allegations that he was underpaid. The outcome of this case will prove interesting considering the Fair Work Ombudsman’s earlier decision that Uber drivers are not classified as ‘employees’.

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Firm shines light on latest gig economy fiasco - Lawyers Weekly

An employment law firm has highlighted the difficulties in a new matter involving the gig economy – this time concerning a former Deliveroo driver who has taken the company to court. McDonald Murholme has weighed in on former Deliveroo driver Jeremy Rhind taking legal action against the food delivery service company over allegations he was

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Defining a work day: a landmark Federal Court decision - HRM

An argument of how the word ‘day’ should be interpreted means organisations across Australia have to rethink entitlements. If you’re in HR and you deal with shift workers, last week’s Federal Court ruling might have you re-configuring the payroll. The case was between two workers at Cadbury’s Chocolate Factory in Claremont, Tasmania, and Cadbury’s parent

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These are the employment law rights of pregnant women and working parents - Women's Agenda

With pregnant women and new parents continuing to be discriminated against at work, we wanted to share a reminder on our legal rights, thanks to employment lawyer Alexandra Targett, from McDonald Murholme Solicitors. Juggling work and parental responsibilities as a first time parent can be both challenging and rewarding, but it’s also a time when

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Elite swimming club in underpayment stoush with coach - The Age

One of the nation’s most respected swimming clubs is embroiled in a bitter legal stoush with a former coach, amid allegations of underpayment, bullying and inappropriate comments towards young athletes. Melbourne Vicentre Swimming Club has produced a string of Olympic champions, including Mack Horton, Giaan Rooney and Michael Klim, but is now accused of underpaying its

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Superannuation guarantee increase harmful to young people, lawyers - Lawyers Weekly

As the superannuation guarantee increase is debated among politicians and the wider public, McDonald Murholme has voiced concern for the youngest Australian earners. The Abbott government froze the superannuation guarantee at 9.5 per cent during the 2014 term, but under current legislation this will rise to 10 per cent in July 2021 before rising by

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Jail time for wage theft: Government moves ahead with plans to criminalise worker exploitation - Smart Company

The federal government will move ahead with plans to criminalise serious worker exploitation within the “next month or so”, as argument rages on about how to deal with Australia’s wage theft crisis. Prime Minister Scott Morrison yesterday confirmed Industrial Relations Minister Christian Porter is drafting legislation which would criminalise worker exploitation, amid a push for

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Reflections on 10 years of the Fair Work Act - Lawyers Weekly

he Fair Work Act has proved “functional and effective”, and should be celebrated by both sides of politics, argues one firm leader. Speaking to Lawyers Weekly, McDonald Murholme managing director Alan McDonald (pictured) said the legislation, introduced in 2009, has “survived many prime ministers, parliaments and pressure groups”. “There has perhaps not been a post-war

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